What were they like to fly?
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What were they like to fly? by D. H. Clarke

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Published by I. Allan in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • World War, 1939-1945 -- Aerial operations, British.,
  • Airplanes, Military.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Stamped on t.p.: Distributed by Sportshelf, New Rochelle, N.Y.

Statement[By] D. H. Clarke.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsD786 .C6
The Physical Object
Pagination128 p.
Number of Pages128
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5935674M
LC Control Number65002668
OCLC/WorldCa3196404

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